Lumbrical muscles (Hand)

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The lumbrical muscles are a set of four small muscles in each hand that act to flex the fingers at the metacarpophalangeal joints, and extend them at the interphalangeal joints. The result is that the ends of the fingers are straightened, but bent at the first knuckle.


Abductor digiti minimi muscle (Hand) Flexor digiti minimi brevis muscle (Hand) Lumbrical muscles (Hand) Lumbrical muscles (Hand) Lumbrical muscles (Hand) Lumbrical muscles (Hand) Palmaris brevis muscle Flexor pollicis brevis muscle Abductor pollicis brevis muscle Opponens pollicis muscle Adductor pollicis muscle'The muscles of the hand.'

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Anatomy diagram of a left hand, with the palm facing forward.

The foot has equivalent muscles, also called lumbrical muscles.

Contents

Origin

The lumbrical muscles of the hand originate from the four tendons of the flexor digitorum profundus muscle as they enter the hand. This is unusual as most muscles originate from a bone.

Insertion

The lumbrical muscles of the hand insert on each of the four fingers on the radial side of the extensor expansion at the dorsum of each proximal phalanx.

Innervation

The lumbrical muscles of the hand are innervated by the median nerve and the deep branch of ulnar nerve (C8 and T1). The median nerve innervates the two muscles on the lateral side while the deep branch of ulnar nerve innervates the two on the medial side.

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